Posts Tagged ‘Honduras’

The Roatan Vortex Show – It Pulls You in and You Never Want to Leave!

March 5, 2010

Moving to Roatan, Honduras, was never optional for me…it was a calling. I posted a story on this experience  Roatan Vortex, there, I explained what happened. I ended it by saying that I wasn’t sure what would come next—well I have something pretty exciting to share with You.

I will be hosting, the “Roatan Vortex” radio show, broadcast live; Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10am until noon (Roatan Time, also known as Central Time; but we don’t do daylight savings in Honduras. You can figure it out.), each and every week on www.roatanradio.com

I want to clarify how that works before I fill you in on the highlights of the show. Roatan Radio is the brainchild of John and Barbara Morris (I’ve posted a story about them too, Passing the Torch). Roatan Radio is an on-line radio station. Which means you go to the website, www.roatanradio.com , once there, give it a few seconds to load—and you will hear the live broadcast. You can continue to do whatever else you want on your computer; surf the net (there is a convenient Google link on the home page), finish a report for your boss, visit with friends on Facebook, etc. etc., just keep Roatan Radio open (minimized is okay) while you’re on your computer.

So that’s how to tune in. Now, here is why I think you will want to. The Roatan Vortex radio show is (sorta) an extension of this blog; Life & Writing, on Roatan.

 There will be a different theme every show, including such compelling topics as;

  • I don’t live on an episode of Survivor—do you?
  • What’s for dinner? Yes, we have peanut butter.
  • Do you ever wonder what your back looks like?

I’ll get the ball rolling by giving you my point-of-view from Roatan, Honduras, and than…wait for it…I want to hear Your point-of-view, from wherever in the world you are! That’s right, the Roatan Vortex show, is a live, call-in, say your piece kind of radio show.

You will be able to contact me via skype, (request being a contact with roatanradio first), or even easier; during each broadcast I will remind you the number to call, from a regular phone (561) 283-4090, West Palm Beach number, (as long as you have a long distance plan that includes Canada and the US) there will be no charge, otherwise your regular long-distance charges will apply. You will also be able to send me messages, and emails. Details on those methods will be updated soon.

So that’s my exciting news! Be sure to tune in Monday, March 8th, for the first official broadcast of the Roatan Vortex show, with your host (me) Genevieve! My mom will be so thrilled that I’m actually using my full name.

The first show’s theme will be: Commuting to Work through the Jungle—and I don’t mean Concrete.

PS Doesn’t the word “theme” make you think of Ralphie from A Christmas Story, having to write a “theme” on what he wants for Christmas? …”You’ll shoot your eye out!”

I Promised Them Seahorses.

February 26, 2010

Since moving to Roatan, Honduras, it’s become a regular occurrence to get an email or skype call that goes something like this;

“Hi Genny, Some friends of mine are coming to Roatan for the first time. I told them I KNOW someone who lives there. Would you mind giving them some inside info on the Island, and maybe meet with them while they are there?”

The most recent time this happened, it involved a group of people coming from Kitchener, Ontario, Canada. With great enthusiasm I fired off emails answering questions and making suggestions of what to do and see when they got here.

High on their list was good snorkelling sites. In particular they wanted to see seahorses. Well, I’m not a snorkeler, but I’ve witness people rave about seeing seahorses below our dock at Sundancer, Sandy Bay. I excitedly invited them to come to our place.

It was a few months later when they arrived to Roatan, and in the meantime I had completely forgot what I had promised. When the van showed up, everyone climbed out, (sunburnt, but content) with looks of anticipation on their faces, and snorkel gear in hand. As we walked to the dock, one of the visitors was adjusting his underwater camera, “can’t wait to take a picture of a seahorse,” he said.

Uh-oh, what had I promised. Ever since I got pulled in by the ‘Roatan Vortex’ I can’t seem to help it. I blurt out more than I should. What if there are no seahorses today? When was the last time one was spotted below our dock? I silently fretted while they prepared to enter the water. They might be disappointed and it would be my fault.

I watched them descend the ladder…I waited…and waited.

“I got it!” The visitor with the camera excitedly exclaimed, scrambling back on to the dock. He set his camera to playback mode, and turned the screen to my direction.

There it was—while snorkelling under our dock—he had snapped a photo of a beautiful, healthy seahorse!

 

Thank You, Roatan. You never let me down!

This story can also be found at Honduras Weekly, www.hondurasweekly.com Category, Cultural.

                       

What an Orange Really Tastes Like.

February 18, 2010

I’ve always enjoyed fresh fruits and vegetables. So weekly, at the grocery store when I lived in Canada, I chose the ones without blemishes or bruises. Heaven forbid anything had a mouldy spot—those items belonged on the day old shelf. Or better yet, throw them away. I’d buy the pre-bagged mini carrots. I’d compare the pineapples. Not sure how to tell if I had picked a good one, I’d spend an extra dollar for one pre-sliced in a plastic container. And I always selected only the orangest of the oranges—perfect colour, perfect dimples, always seedless.

Then I moved to Roatan. I anticipated finding the best of the best (as I knew it). Very quickly I had to change my way of thinking. If I was only willing to select what looked like it could be used for a photo-shoot for Delmonte, I might as well start buying canned peas and fruit-cups.

The carrots here are big and gnarly. The melons have spots, the celery is pretty limp, and the oranges, well…they are down-right ugly. Pale yellowy-grey skin, absolutely no dimples, and nary a sticker confirming they are seedless. I wasn’t even sure they were oranges until I saw a street vender selling them. He had a pile of them stacked high in a cart, and a tool, much like an apple peeler; he used to remove the tough outer layer. I watched people purchase oranges from him for a few Limps (pennies) each.

I bought a couple, took them home, realized I could not peel them; I sliced one open, and flicked out the many seeds. The inside colour wasn’t much better than the outside, but it did seem to be quite juicy. I sliced it again, and prepared a wedge to pop into my mouth. Removal of more seeds, and I gave it a try. The flavour was unlike any orange I had ever tasted before. It was the sweetest, most delectable orange I ever had the pleasure to eat.

THIS is how an orange should taste.

So if ever you come to Roatan, Honduras, try not to turn your nose up at the ugly oranges, give one a try—you will be pleasantly surprised.  The carrots, pineapples and melons are pretty awesome too! And the limp celery—just soak it in some cold water.

This story is also posted at www.hondurasweekly.com News Catagories; Culture.

Where the Heck is Roatan?

December 29, 2009

Where the Heck is Roatan?

Answer – Between Utila and Guanaja.

At least that is what the very popular tourist t-shirt has printed on it.

Without making you feel like you are back in grade school geography class, (I would get pretty glassy-eyed in that class). I will keep the explanation simple.

Roatan is an island off the coast of Honduras, in the Caribbean Ocean. On one side is the even smaller island of Utila, and the other side is the island of Guanaja (hence the t-shirt). All three islands are part of the chain of islands known as the Bay Islands. Roatan is surrounded by the second biggest barrier reef (Australia is first). The beaches are soft white sand. The foliage is lush and tropical (yes, bananas and coconuts grow here), starting from the beaches rising toward a central ridge of foothill’s. I don’t think they qualifies as mountains—okay, so not boring you with geography isn’t my only reason for keeping the details simple.

When I stand on our dock looking to the North, a few hundred miles away (I think) is the border between Belize and Mexico. To the West (when watching the fabulous sunsets) I am facing Guatemala. South is mainland Honduras, and to the East is the Cayman Islands and Jamaica. I should mention that Honduras (which Roatan is part of) is in Central America, between Mexico and South America. I’m not trying to be condescending; before I came here I didn’t know where Central America was, let alone Honduras.

With great pleasure, I could tell you so much more about Roatan; the ocean, teaming with coral and marine life, the jungle landscapes, the glorious year round tropical climate, the diverse cultural mix, tourist attractions, etc. etc. etc. But there are many sites offering much better information on these kinds of details.

What I have to share is a firsthand account of living here. And through that I believe you will come to love it as much as those of us who have chosen to call it home. Roatan is a hidden gem worthy of exploring. But be warned: Once the Roatan Vortex sucks you in…You will never want to leave.

I’ll elaborate on that in my next post.

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